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20121117
20121117
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> these guys are important. unlike human beings, as we change the environment is bad for the environment, beavers form wetlands other species could move into. he's important. >> what else does he eat besides bananas? >> in the wild he would be eating all sorts of vegetation and they like to eat tree bark. he has teeth on them that are so much enamel that are bright orange. these guys chop down trees and build dams with them. >> you don't want to get in front of an angry beaver. >> bring out the owl. >> let me put the baby alligator away. the last animal is another species that would have been -- >> what are they called? >> barn owl. these are a species native to europe. european colonists would have been used to seeing these guys. they're not particularly common. these animals can find prey in pitch darkness. >> you're kidding. >> tests have been done on these species, they've removed every iota of light. just by their hearing they can find rodents which is their main prey. they are called barn owls, because they are one of the few species that can live in human structures and benefit fr
changing rapidly as a factor in the environment is to knowledge across the board, primarily information technology in various manifestations and that seems like a drastic reshaping, but also can have effects on where the apparent power resources, traditional kinds of nontraditional kinds. although we often highlight the potential for empowered individuals can go around and cause havoc using new technologies and new dangers and threats, there's a new bond film out. every bond film has featured some transnational nonstate actor going on with the technology causing havoc. i'm not sure how terribly new threat that is. new technologies seem to reinforce the power of existing orders. if you think of the degree to which the national ecological revolution has reenergized the north american energy markets is fundamentally reset politics towards the traditional powers in the west rather than away from them come when you think about drones in the war on terror and the degree to which technology has allowed a tight footprint that is far more effective in many respects than the specific task of gett
to day livelihood in plays like west virginia, louisiana. while their environment is being destroyed, if you think about louisiana as a state that is being literally destroyed by the industry that employs a good number of the people there. so every mechanism in that state is designed to protect an industry that's destroying the state. but people as real lives are tied to it. even democrats, someone like jay rockefeller who is considered a great prerogative when it comes to coal, he's are with the republicans. >> anyone who is going to be elected -- there are certain places where it's the geographic interests override the ideological ones. >> that's why is we need some actually leadership from the president, and others on the really central issues. i mean, look, climate change is the legacy issue of all legacy issues. you know, 100 years from now, the only thing that people are going to look back on 2012 and care about. the fiscal cliff or the -- it's like, you guys the arctic melts and you didn't do anything about it? why is that? >> keystone is one pipeline. the canadian company is
system. so it's awkward to support a group like this. but there is support for it in this environment. the system will dissolve because there's resistance. >> trevor, i often feel when you talk to political operatives on both sides and fundraisers on both sides and donors, there's a strong word, but it's kind of a self hating quality to the people who are participating in the system. they feel trapped. this thing is going to go on and therefore the plaintiff used to it. is that what is sustaining this? >> well, during the course of the campaign i had a chance to talk to a range of major republican donors and even may feel republicans are more interested in the super pacs. the party had embraced them and citizens united. i thought rummy donors say to me, this is terrible. i don't want to rent an unlimited check if this is not our president not to get selected and we need to talk about this after the election. so now i think one of the things that i be doing is certainly untruths are you back around and say are you into changing the system? if you look at it, even the candidates are pri
it, is the things we are doing to the environment, making these things more unbearable. construction, an earthquake there was one in chile that killed less than a hundred people, fewer than a hundred people. all of these things, and people have been forced to leave the countryside, to come to the city. so we often also discussed these things and how devotion in the land -- how it causes us to have these massive mudslides and flooding when a hurricane goes through. these things, they are more of the things that we can do something about as a community. but these other theories, they are also talked about. >> host: in reading through your book, "so spoke the earth: the haiti i knew, the haiti i know, the haiti i want to know", i was struck that so many writers return to haiti. >> guest: i think so many of us come as children. we were a lot like our parents. arkansas like they had no choice to leave. so you do have this yearning for your country. and i have a lot of family that i did quite a lot. but there is this yearning, things that are parents described as a paradise and things to f
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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